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(This post was written for The Book App Alliance, an organization of leading authors in the publishing industry who create interactive books for kids. See: http://www.bookappalliance.com/

 

To engage children and keep them interested, and to impart information in a fun way, many app creators use simple forms of “gamification”: lift-the-flap activities, mazes, guessing games, inside-outside concepts, search-n-find, ABCs and numbers, puzzles, matching games, Q&A, hidden objects, word/noun object recognition, and so forth. The games have to be logically associated and integrated with the subject – not just put in gratuitously.

I don’t do fantasy or digital video-type games. I make mainly nonfiction apps. However, many subjects lend themselves to these sorts of game-like interactive formats. It’s great for Common Core. For learning about concepts, people, animals, a historical period, science, a workplace, you can cast the content in an interactive way – children can look under flaps to discover things, answer Q&As (and earn points), play matching games, find and count items, look for hidden ABCs, solve a maze…often in collaboration with others.

Some of my apps with games, all built by OCG Studios:

Roxie’s a-MAZE-ing Vacation Adventure” (games: solving interconnected mazes, out to the goal and back to the starting place, through 16 screens; finding various items like a recurring penguin, other animals, designated vehicles, numbers, alphabet letters, more; score is kept; up to five players):

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Roxie’s Doors” (games: seek-n-find objects behind flaps, doors, in drawers, under/inside things, etc; naming/vocabulary [word highlighting]):

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Roxie’s Puzzle Adventure” (game: 16 interconnected jigsaw puzzles/screens – choose between 6 and 260 pieces per puzzle/screen; choose rotation, hints, music; up to five players):

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Coming out in September 2014: a series of 11 AR (augmented reality) apps designed to work with KIWiStoryBooks (giant interactive walk-in picture books; themes: Rainforest, Dinosaurs, Space Station, Coral Reef, Farm, Maze, Castle, Fire Station, more):

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“Seek-n-Find.” Matching game; with iPad camera, match images found in backdrop (here, Maze and Farm):

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“Make Some Noise.” Click on images, hear the sounds, and record your own (here, Fire Station and Space Station):

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“Explore & Learn.” Q&A with information and fun multiple choice answers with rewards, games, hidden details/scratch off (here, Rainforest, TV Station, Castle, and Dinosaurs). Activated by scanning markers/stickers placed on KIWiStoryBook:

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“Movie-making.” Use iPad camera and supplied frames to make series of 1-minute videos. Combined/edited into 8-minute movie w/kids’ own voiceovers/narration (here, Coral Reef and Wild West/Native Americans):

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“Puzzles.” Activated by scanning markers/stickers placed on KIWiStoryBook (here, Desert and Fire Station):

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Engaging in games helps children with concentration, setting goals, problem-solving, working together and collaboration (many allow multiple players), perseverance, and celebrate achieving goals. Many games, and mazes in particular, also help children learn decision-making and critical thinking skills. They make them think ahead and plan steps in advance. Mazes teach alternative ways to solve problems and judge spatial relationships. For younger children, they help develop fine motor skills; for older children, maneuvering through mazes helps improve handwriting. Game formats are particularly suited to reluctant readers, special needs children, and boys (although girls are rapidly catching up).

So, using games in apps enhances learning, engagement, and collaboration. And, of course, they’re fun!!!

More info, see Gamification post below on interactivity in print books, and

Using games in the classroom: http://teacherswithapps.com/teachers-surveyed-on-using-games-in-the-classroom/

 

 

Authors all over are playing tag.

Someone came up with the idea to have a “blog hop”– a writer answers a few questions about his or her work, then tags two other authors in the post, and then they post and tag two other people and so on. Last week I was tagged by Mina Javaherbin, the award-winning author of Goal and The Secret Message. Her wonderful books are multicultural…she is interested in the “new global village way of life.” Mina and I met up in New York a couple years ago, and connected immediately – she is brilliant, vibrant, and involved. Please check out her websitehttp://minajavaherbin.com/ ) and her great books!

So on to The Next Big Thing questions for me:

1. What is the title of your work-in-progress? Slithery Snakes

Roxie Munro

2. Where did the idea come from? It evolved from a series of nature books I’ve created: Hatch! (about birds); Busy Builders (bugs); EcoMazes: 12 Earth Adventures (ecosystems); Desert Days, Desert Nights (desert habitats).

3. What genre does your book come under? Nonfiction, or informational, children’s picture books.

4. Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie?  Sir Hiss from the animated “Robin Hood” movie, the viper in “Kung Fu Panda,” Nagini in “Harry Potter”?

5. One sentence synopsis for your book? Brilliantly painted snake skin patterns, and some fun facts – try to guess the snake species; turn the page to see the answer, with the snake in its habitat.

6. Is your book self-published, published by an independent publisher, or represented by an agency? Out in August from Two Lions, Amazon Children’s Publishing.

7. How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript? Six months.

8. What other books would you compare this story to within your genre? Hmmmm – maybe books by Lynne Cherry or Mia Posada.

9. Who or what inspired you to write this book? I think certain aspects of nature can be stranger than anything you can dream up!

10.What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest? The vibrant colors and patterns, and some fun and wild information about snakes!

And now, I am tagging two wonderful children’s book folks:

Pat Cummings (website: http://www.patcummings.com/ ) has been an artist all her life. She speaks at conferences, teaches, cohosts “Cover to Cover” (a talk show about the children’s book industry), and works with CBBC (Children’s Book Boot Camp). She’s also involved with PEN and SCBWI. Pat’s fabulous books, many of which she both writes and illustrates, have a strong graphic look …powerful and compelling.

Joy Chu has worked with books most of her life, as a designer and art director for many major publishers. She now runs Joy Chu Designs, as a graphic designer and publishing consultant. Her work has been cited by AIGA, BookBuilders West, the Society of Illustrators, National Book Awards, Print, Step-by-Step, and Publishers Weekly. She’s active in SCBWI, teaches, and writes the popular Got Story Countdown blog. (http://gotstorycountdown.wordpress.com/ )