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So, kind of like when a person finally gets a diagnosis – a name – for an illness, this is a great relief.

Sometimes I have had moments of doubt when trying to categorize my own books. Usually I call them nonfiction – they’re about real things. My nature/science (birds, bugs, snakes, and dinosaurs) and biography books fit snugly into the basic nonfiction category. But some others, for example the lift-the-flap paper-engineered books, like Go! Go! Go! (about transportation), Circus, Rodeo, and Doors (you learn about what’s in a doctor’s office, horse barn, boat, train, mechanic’s garage, space station, etc), are a little quirky and are occasionally even considered “novelty” books. They don’t fall neatly into the nonfiction category. And books like Market Maze and Ecomazes: 12 Earth Adventures use “gamification” and educational devices not typical of nonfiction books. Some are concept books (for instance, Mazeways: A to Z – an alphabet book that shows real-life things and their environs, like an airport, boatyard, highways, etc). Then there are nonfiction ideas that are wrapped around a finding/counting/naming format, like Desert Days, Desert Nights and Ranch.

Turns out there’s a name for these works… Informational books!

You could call informational books a subset of nonfiction. Nonfiction includes any content or text that is factual. However, not all nonfiction is considered informational. The main purpose of informational texts is to inform or instruct the reader in some way.

Informational text often teaches about the social and natural world (and frequently, in my case, the man-made world). A biography is a classic form of nonfiction; it teaches us about an individual’s life, and certain points in history, but it is not considered “informational.” A procedural or how-to text tells one how to do something; it doesn’t convey information about a particular topic. Other forms of nonfiction may be narrative (like a memoir). Informational text differs from other types of nonfiction in purpose, features, and, often, format.

There are many benefits, besides learning facts, to children when they are exposed to informational books. Understanding new words is one. From So Much More Than the ABCs: The Early Phases of Reading and Writing by Judith A. Schickedanz and Molly F. Collins:  “Because informational books contain many sophisticated technical words and explain them explicitly, reading this kind of book helps children learn higher-level vocabulary.” The illustrations, and sometimes charts and other imagery in informational picture books, enhance learning, thinking, and contribute to increased comprehension… they can be a form of visual cognition for some children.

Informational books often address children’s specific interests and questions about the world. Librarians tell me that these are the books most often asked for; their young patrons want to learn about and understand how things work, are built, what they look like, where they come from. The various ways in which writers and illustrators create these informational works make for some engaging books which enlighten and inform children, often in lively, accessible, and fun formats.

Here’s some more info:

http://www.naeyc.org/books/so_much_more_than_the_abcs/excerpt

http://www.teachersfirst.com/exclusives/moreless/librarian/fuss/q2.cfm

 

(This post was written for The Book App Alliance, an organization of leading authors in the publishing industry who create interactive books for kids. See: http://www.bookappalliance.com/

 

To engage children and keep them interested, and to impart information in a fun way, many app creators use simple forms of “gamification”: lift-the-flap activities, mazes, guessing games, inside-outside concepts, search-n-find, ABCs and numbers, puzzles, matching games, Q&A, hidden objects, word/noun object recognition, and so forth. The games have to be logically associated and integrated with the subject – not just put in gratuitously.

I don’t do fantasy or digital video-type games. I make mainly nonfiction apps. However, many subjects lend themselves to these sorts of game-like interactive formats. It’s great for Common Core. For learning about concepts, people, animals, a historical period, science, a workplace, you can cast the content in an interactive way – children can look under flaps to discover things, answer Q&As (and earn points), play matching games, find and count items, look for hidden ABCs, solve a maze…often in collaboration with others.

Some of my apps with games, all built by OCG Studios:

Roxie’s a-MAZE-ing Vacation Adventure” (games: solving interconnected mazes, out to the goal and back to the starting place, through 16 screens; finding various items like a recurring penguin, other animals, designated vehicles, numbers, alphabet letters, more; score is kept; up to five players):

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Roxie’s Doors” (games: seek-n-find objects behind flaps, doors, in drawers, under/inside things, etc; naming/vocabulary [word highlighting]):

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Roxie’s Puzzle Adventure” (game: 16 interconnected jigsaw puzzles/screens – choose between 6 and 260 pieces per puzzle/screen; choose rotation, hints, music; up to five players):

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Coming out in September 2014: a series of 11 AR (augmented reality) apps designed to work with KIWiStoryBooks (giant interactive walk-in picture books; themes: Rainforest, Dinosaurs, Space Station, Coral Reef, Farm, Maze, Castle, Fire Station, more):

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“Seek-n-Find.” Matching game; with iPad camera, match images found in backdrop (here, Maze and Farm):

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“Make Some Noise.” Click on images, hear the sounds, and record your own (here, Fire Station and Space Station):

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“Explore & Learn.” Q&A with information and fun multiple choice answers with rewards, games, hidden details/scratch off (here, Rainforest, TV Station, Castle, and Dinosaurs). Activated by scanning markers/stickers placed on KIWiStoryBook:

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“Movie-making.” Use iPad camera and supplied frames to make series of 1-minute videos. Combined/edited into 8-minute movie w/kids’ own voiceovers/narration (here, Coral Reef and Wild West/Native Americans):

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“Puzzles.” Activated by scanning markers/stickers placed on KIWiStoryBook (here, Desert and Fire Station):

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Engaging in games helps children with concentration, setting goals, problem-solving, working together and collaboration (many allow multiple players), perseverance, and celebrate achieving goals. Many games, and mazes in particular, also help children learn decision-making and critical thinking skills. They make them think ahead and plan steps in advance. Mazes teach alternative ways to solve problems and judge spatial relationships. For younger children, they help develop fine motor skills; for older children, maneuvering through mazes helps improve handwriting. Game formats are particularly suited to reluctant readers, special needs children, and boys (although girls are rapidly catching up).

So, using games in apps enhances learning, engagement, and collaboration. And, of course, they’re fun!!!

More info, see Gamification post below on interactivity in print books, and

Using games in the classroom: http://teacherswithapps.com/teachers-surveyed-on-using-games-in-the-classroom/

 

 

One of the most exciting days in the life of a children’s book author (or illustrator) is when you learn that your book has been accepted for publication. But, receiving, years later, the often inevitable “We regret to say…” publisher’s letter announcing that your book is going OP (out-of-print) is rarely welcome.

This isn’t always bad news though…particularly these days, when there are so many options available for authors. But first, you have to make sure, when you sign the original contract, that you can ask for the rights back when the book goes out-of-print (OP). All mainstream publisher’s book contracts contain a clause referring to this. Not “out of stock,” but “out of print.” You need to clarify what OP means… I just signed a contract and had them add language that specifies that if the only edition available is an electronic one, there must be a minimum number of sales/income (usually spread over two royalty periods or one year) for the book to be considered in print. Whatever the number/amount is, it should be sensible in terms of the kind of book and likely sales, for print or ebooks. So make sure that a POD (print on demand) or electronic version does not constitute being “in print,” unless you also specify an amount (sales or income) for those options. (Because most publishers aren’t yet doing apps, in my latest contract, I retained the app rights only, among the electronic options.)

You don’t need a lawyer; just send a letter asking for the rights to be reverted to you. They usually have six months to respond to your request; if they don’t, the rights automatically revert to the author anyway. Some publishers send back the copyright papers; some don’t. Also, and this is important, ask for the electronic files/printer’s files (or printer’s film, if it is an old book). You may have to pay a fee for this, but it is worth it if you ever want to reprint or sell the rights. (In my case, a lot of original illustrations have been sold and are unavailable; it would be impossible to rescan them.)

The publisher usually allows you to buy a quantity of your books at a deep discount, when they notify you that your book is going OP. Always do this! The first few years I didn’t quite understand that OP meant (that, unless another publisher or opportunity comes along, that is IT for your book!), so I didn’t buy enough copies, and now only have a few left of some of my titles, which sell occasionally for a lot on Ebay!

So, now your book is OP, and you have had the rights reverted to you, and have acquired the electronic files. There are many opportunities available now to recycle, reprint, and reuse your content.

You may want to make (and will need to market) your own print book, ebook, or app. You may be able to find a publisher to reissue the whole book again (with perhaps an update, or a reworked cover). For this you get a new contract and new advance. The contract is similar to any original book contract, but the advance is usually less. (I’ve sold the rights for three of my OP books, which have been reprinted, with four more OP books in negotiation right now to be reissued, and have sold one book’s rights to make an app.)

And licensing is a great option… anywhere from a picture or paragraph, to whole chapter excerpts. If the book was still in print, you would usually get 50% of the fee (the publisher does the negotiation and gets the other 50%), but if you own all the rights, you get it all! There are various algorithms that will help you calculate what to charge (and, for a model, check the past rights deals done by your publisher; they usually send the details to you). Fees are mostly determined by the size of image or excerpt and quantity of print and e-rights requested (not necessarily the duration of the license). Usually they come to you, so marketing rights like this on your own is not easy. The way it works: the request is sent to your publisher the first time, and they forward it to you (because the rights have reverted). If you have already licensed to the company, from now on they will come directly to you, often to relicense the materials after the agreed upon time period for the first license has expired. They supply the forms and language in their letter/request; you just agree to it, give a price, a credit line, and sign. I’ve sold rights to excerpts from my books (most written with my husband, Bo Zaunders) for thousands of dollars to the IOWA State Reading Tests (used throughout the USA), as well as other school tests. With CCSS (Common Core) coming along (whether we like it or not), testing will continue to be a big part of education. You may also get reprint requests for visual images or covers, for various publications.

Besides reissuing or reprinting all or part of the book in a traditional print format, as mentioned, you can remake it, or parts of it, into a POD (print-on-demand) book, an ebook, an app, or other transmedia forms (website, blog series, etc).

Consider all of your hard work – creativity and ideas, research, crafting the book, your intellectual property – a tangible asset. Its value does not end when the print run is finished. Think of it as unique content, available to be “exploited” (by you!) in more and different ways. This is a wonderful time in publishing – great variety, a multitude of formats – and for authors, more control than ever over our work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I attended Author (R)evolution Day (TOC) last week, and met a children’s book author sitting nearby. She said, “Soon, having an app will be as imperative as having a website.”

I’ve been thinking about that. Maybe, instead of creating an app to make money (good luck! marketing an app is not easy), you should think of it as an investment in branding, promotion, and showing your best work in a creative new format.

(Re: For fundamentals for children’s book writers/illustrators making apps, including creative, financial, marketing, go to An a-MAZE-ing Transition: Roxie Munro Talks about Print, Digital & Lessons Learned. )

Do it right. Don’t spend money, time, and your creative assets, and be disappointed. There are programs available (some with a steep time-consuming learning curve), and you may have a tech-y friend who volunteers to build your app. Some even “practice” making an app, using your money and creative content! But I recommend getting an experienced professional children’s app developer. It is worth the money, and may prevent a lot of stress and heartbreak. Do your homework: check out apps and figure out what you want (and need, to keep current); find out what functionality and issues are no-nos for parent/teacher/librarian reviewers, including privacy issues; what works with your concept, like animations, text/word highlighting, sounds, music; and get an idea of pricing – it varies a lot.

Some of my author/illustrator friends have had troubling problems: late delivery (4 to 6 or more months to make your app); expensive for what they got; developer used out-dated technology; a lack of follow-up with updates, bug fixes, and customer support; inadequate testing; no real creative collaboration or input.

Once a developer has made your app, you are stuck with them; if they don’t do updates or bug fixes in a timely manner (or at all!), there is not a lot you can do. Usually you can’t turn over the app to a new developer, because much of what goes into building it (coding for example) is proprietary, the intellectual property of the developer. Why would they hand it over to another, possibly rival, company? (You can change this in your contract, but most developers do not want to dive into someone else’s code.)

Am very happy with my developer, OCG Studios (my website home page has some awards and kudos). We’ve made two apps together with several more coming out in April. They have a cool new DYO (Develop Your Own) framework for making illustrated apps. Check out a free example (“The Artist Mortimer”). The program for making apps is explained…you do some work, they build it, and you save a lot of money. Scroll down the page to see pricing. If you’re interested, they send a menu and more info.

But you don’t have to use my guys. Get developer recommendations (check out the awards and reviews their apps have; look at customer comments on the App Store page). A good place to learn about developers and children’s apps is Moms With Apps. On the right side, they have links to more info, and scrolling down, a list of children’s app developers. I don’t know the developers’ commissioning guidelines, but they are experienced. And check out Digital Storytime, great for lots of information and reviews.